Snohomish Farmers Market to move downtown


Snohomish Farmers Market to move downtown

SNOHOMISH — The Snohomish Farmers Market is moving this year to be along Union and Glen Avenues.
The city council last week authorized a municipal permit to let the market operate there. Its usual site near Cedar and First, for its full footprint, has not been made available by the city for this year.
“We’re optimistic about the location, but there’s a lot of work ahead of us” for this year, market manager Sarah Dylan Jensen said. One will be to cement the new location in the minds of buyers.
The market is losing some of its capacity. This footprint can hold about 100 vendors, compared to over 125 vendors along Cedar Avenue.
The seasonal market opens on Thursday, May 5.
Business owners along Union and Glen have expressed reluctance to City Council over disruptions to their storefronts. Disruptions are not only due to the fact that parking is removed.
Businesses by appointment said this would prevent them from being able to serve their customers.
Owners of Pizza Brava said the location of the market will seriously hurt take-out sales.
Some business owners have described their fear of a “tent wall” blocking people from accessing their storefronts.
Officially, the permit is “curb to curb” on the roadway and not on the sidewalk. The market will have gaps between so many vendor spaces so people can jump from the street to the sidewalk, Dylan Jensen said.
The city moves the footprint away from the Pizza Brava Market and the Bank of America exit aisle. Access to the Snohomish Laundry Company would only be from Pearl Street, a secondary entrance, to its main storefront along Glen Avenue.
Retired businessman John Hager, whose Collector’s Choice restaurant was located where Pizza Brava now stands, told city council the deal was a boon for business as it would capitalize on marketing to visiting buyers.
Last year, space on Cedar Avenue impacted the Carnegie Building at 105 Cedar Ave., from which the city generates rental revenue. Last year, the Carnegie became operational in April but was not rented on Thursday market days.
The city informed the market last year that it would no longer issue permits this year. The new market had been operating at Cedar and First for about 15 years.
In addition to Union and Glen, the city provided alternative market space on the unpaved grass of Averill Field. Muddy grass, upcoming building plans and inaccessibility for wheelchair users were all mentioned as reasons for not locating the market there at last week’s council meeting.
A third alternative was to give the market a much smaller footprint along Cedar Avenue. Dylan Jensen said it was launched at the last minute.
The 2020 market took place in the Stocker Farms parking lot, but was only a one-year special arrangement.
Council horsefly Morgan Davis said the market could be along First Street west of Avenue D in the open cobblestone area near the Town Store, where the mid-to-late market was held. late 1990s.
Dylan Jensen said “my interest is absolutely piqued” in this location, but said she wouldn’t want to move the market every year.
Market wanted the city council to make a decision on its location by March 1 so it could finalize listings in regional tourist directories and be listed in the Washington Food and Farm Guide Directory, Dylan Jensen said. It also had to meet deadlines with the government to be able to offer a system for shoppers who use SNAP benefit programs (EBT cards, formerly called food stamps) in the market.

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